Press Room

PRESS RELEASES

Aeronautical Systems Engineering (ASE) of Odessa, Florida is proud to announce that their Cessna Citation Ultra 560 Full Flight Simulator (FFS) achieved FAA Level D certification on Thursday, January 26, 2017 at LOFT Training Center in Carlsbad, California. 

The ASE manufactured FFS is integrated with ASE’s: flight test data, proprietary electric digital control loading system, and synthetic sound system.  This simulator is also incorporated with an E2M all electric digital motion system and RSI image generator.

For more than 20 years, ASE has manufactured and supported flight simulator training devices capable of worldwide regulatory approval.  Capabilities span all aspects of simulation from desktop trainers through qualified full flight simulators and mission system trainers.  ASE has earned a proven track record of on-time delivery, exceptional simulator performance, and customer satisfaction.

For more information about ASE and our training solutions, please visit us at www.aerosyseng.com:

Office: (727) 375.2520 ext.113 / Email:  info@aerosyseng.com

Aeronautical Systems Engineering (ASE) of Odessa, Florida is proud to announce that their King Air C90A full flight simulator achieved FAA Level C certification on Thursday, May 5, 2016 at US Aviation Flight Academy in Denton, Texas. The ASE manufactured full flight simulator is integrated with ASE’s Flight Test Data, ASE’s proprietary electric digital control loading system, an E2M all electric digital motion system, and RSI Image Generator.

For more than 20 years, ASE has manufactured and supported flight simulator training devices capable of worldwide regulatory approval. Capabilities span all aspects of simulation from desktop trainers through qualified full flight simulators and mission system trainers. By developing new technology, deploying an experienced business management team, and working collaboratively with their customers, ASE has developed a proven track record of on-time delivery, exceptional simulator performance, and customer satisfaction.

For more information, please contact ASE, Inc. at (727) 375.2520 ext.113 or email info@aerosyseng.com. To learn more about ASE, please visit the company’s website at www.aerosyseng.com.

Flight Crew Systems, Inc., dba LOFT of Carlsbad, California has formed a partnership

with Aeronautical Systems Engineering, Inc. (ASE) of Odessa, Florida for the purpose of

producing innovative, state-of-the-art pilot training equipment for the LOFT pilot training

center at McClellan-Palomar Airport in Carlsbad, California.

Together, ASE and LOFT proudly announce the completion of a CitationJet1 (Model

CE-525) Level C full flight simulator with a simulated Collins Pro Line 21 avionics suite

scheduled for delivery to LOFT’s Carlsbad facility in the fall of 2009. The CJ1 flight

simulator is currently undergoing the final stages of testing to ensure Level C

certification under the National Simulator Program. Implementing ASE’s new 32” stroke

electric motion system, the CJ1 flight simulator will provide a safe and efficient training

platform for clients to gain initial certification as well as insurance-prompted or FAR

prompted recurrent training. The CJ1 flight simulator marks the beginning of a multisimulator

training facility with a second Level C full flight simulator currently under

development.

ASE, Inc. manufacturers, markets, and supports Flight Simulator Training Devices

capable of worldwide regulatory approval. ASE also manufactures a series of electric

digital control loading (EDCL) systems for simulators and flight training devices, and 2,

3, and 6-DOF electric motion systems. By developing new innovative technology,

deploying an experienced business management team, and working collaboratively with

their customers, ASE has developed a proven track record of on-time delivery,

exceptional simulator performance and exemplary customer satisfaction.

Flight Crew Systems, Inc., dba LOFT has successfully performed in-aircraft jet training

for over 10 years. The company specializes in Cessna Citation aircraft and offers a

multitude of courses to include initial pilot certification, recurrent training, second-incommand

training, and mentor programs. The debut of the CJ1 simulator will diversify

the course offerings and propel the company into the simulator-based training field.

LOFT intends to gain FAR Part 142 approval and the company plans to unveil new

proprietary course materials in conjunction with the CJ1 simulator courses. LOFT’s

mission is to provide the highest quality CitationJet training at competitive prices.

For more information, please contact ASE at (727) 375-2520 or LOFT at (760) 476-0890.

To learn more about ASE, please

ASE, Inc. Odessa, Florida achieved FAA 14 CFR Part 60, Level C qualification on a new Cessna CitationJet1 (Model CE-525) full flight simulator with a simulated Collins Pro Line 21 avionics suite. The ASE manufactured CJ1 full flight simulator is integrated with ASE’s proprietary electric digital control loading system, ASE’s new proprietary electric motion system, and RSI Raster XT PC Image Generator with 180ºx40º field of view.

ASE manufacturers, markets, and supports flight simulator-training devices capable of worldwide regulatory approval. ASE also manufactures a series of digital electric control loading systems and 2-, 3-, and 6-DOF electric motion systems and offers full service flight test and model development services. By developing new technology, deploying an experienced business management team, and working collaboratively with our customers, ASE has developed a proven track record of on-time delivery, exceptional simulator performance, and customer satisfaction.

For more information, please contact ASE, Inc. at +1 727 375 2520 ext. 113 or email info@aerosyseng.com. To learn more about ASE, please visit the company’s website at www.aerosyseng.com.

ASE, Inc. Odessa, Florida announced completion of the design, manufacture, and installation of two Cirrus SR22 G-3 Simulators for the Dubai Aerospace Enterprise Flight Academy.

One unit was approved by the FAA as an Advanced Aviation Training Device on September 11, 2008.  The second is a JAR 2A Level 2 Flight Training Device and was qualified in Ras al Khaimah, UAE on September 19.  The FTD includes a 220 X 50 visual system.  ASE conducted a flight test program to obtain the aerodynamic modeling and validation data package. Two more devices are scheduled for delivery to the DAE Flight Academy in January 2009.

ASE manufacturers, markets, and supports flight simulator training devices (FSTDs) capable of worldwide regulatory approval. ASE also manufactures a series of digital electric control loading systems and 2-, 3-, and 6-DOF electric motion systems and offers full service flight test and model development services. By developing new technology, deploying an experienced business management team, and working collaboratively with our customers, ASE has developed a proven track record of on-time delivery, exceptional simulator performance, and customer satisfaction.

For more information, please contact ASE, Inc. at +1 727 375 2520 ext. 113 or email info@aerosyseng.com. To learn more about ASE, please visit the company’s website at www.aerosyseng.com.

ASE, Inc. Odessa, Florida today announced completion of Aircraft Flight Testing in a Cessna

Citation Ultra for Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Level C/D simulator data package and

model development.

As part of an FAA Level C full flight simulator development contract, ASE installed

instrumentation, sensors, and their proprietary state-of-the-art data acquisition system in a

leased, 8 passenger Citation Ultra business jet. The FAA re-certified “experimental” aircraft and

ASE’s flight test crew accomplished a series of ground and flight maneuvers in accordance with

FAA and IATA documents and guidelines. ASE utilizes their own proprietary software in the

process of converting the acquired raw data into models and the final data package required for

regulatory evaluation and qualification of the Ultra full flight simulator. ASE is one of the very few

simulator engineering and manufacturing companies capable of conducting their own internal

data acquisition flight test program and model development.

ASE manufacturers, markets, and supports flight simulator training devices (FSTDs) capable of

worldwide regulatory approval. ASE also manufactures a series of digital electric control loading

(EDCL) systems for simulators and FTDs, and 2, 3, and 6-DOF electric motion systems. By

developing new innovative technology, deploying an experienced business management team,

and working collaboratively with our customers, ASE has developed a proven track record of ontime

delivery, exceptional simulator performance and exemplary customer satisfaction.

For more information, please contact ASE, Inc. at +1 727 375 2520 ext. 113 or email

info@aerosyseng.com . To learn more about ASE, please visit the company’s web site at

www.aerosyseng.com.

ASE, Inc., Odessa, Florida, announces the placement and qualification of a Piper Seneca (PA34) Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Level 6 Flight Simulator Training Device (FSTD) at Recurrent Training Center (RTC), in Savoy, Illinois. 

ASE’s Level 6 FSTD will be used by RTC in support of their FAA certified multi-engine and type specific pilot training programs. The FSTD design is derived from ASE’s standard Level C/D full flight simulator technology and software delivering Level 6 compliant training and checking performance that is truly an accurate replication of the aircraft. Level 6 features delivered in RTC’s Seneca FSTD include ASE’s proprietary flight test data and aircraft model package, AGD graphic instrumentation system, FTDload electric digital control loading system, Raster FG3 visual system with 150 degree display, and full visual/training compartment enclosure, SIMsound digital sound and audio, ATG automatic testing system, and full featured IOS, all in a classroom footprint of 16ft W x 14ft D x 8ft H.

“Pilots, such as RTC’s highly qualified instructors, who have flown ASE’s simulators consistently express how closely it reproduces the performance of the airplane. From our precisely collected flight test data to our force-feel controls, and aerodynamics & systems modeling, we designed beyond the minimum requirements for Level 6. This allowed us to deliver true realism, and high-fidelity simulation that is virtually indistinguishable from the actual airplane,” states Al Acord, Vice President Marketing and Business Development. “ASE has successfully pushed the boundaries and introduced new technology that revolutionizes regulatory qualified FSTDs and will vastly improve the overall maintainability and long-term reliability of our devices.”

ASE, Inc. markets, manufacturers, and supports flight simulator training devices (FSTDs) capable of worldwide regulatory approval. ASE also manufactures a series of digital electric control loading (EDCL) systems for simulators and FTDs, 2, 3, and 6-DOF electric motion systems, and offers full service flight testing and model development services. By developing new innovative technology, deploying an experienced business management team, and working collaboratively with our customers, ASE has developed a proven track record of on-time delivery, exceptional simulator performance and exemplary customer satisfaction.

For more information, please contact ASE, Inc. at +1 727 375 2520 ext. 113 or email info@aerosyseng.com. To learn more about ASE, please visit the company’s web site at www.aerosyseng.com.

ASE, Inc. of Odessa, Florida partnered with SimCom Training Centers in Orlando, Florida to achieve FAA qualification on a Beech Jet 400A full motion simulator.

This collaboration enabled ASE, Inc. to initiate their first Electric Digital Control Loader with FAA approval for a Level C. The 6DOF, full flight simulator will be supplied with the Collins Pro Line 4 integrated avionics system with the FMS-5000 flight management system.

ASE and SimCom have continually been able to excel as a team, working off each others strengths to produce quality, cost conscious simulation projects. Developing and delivering to their customers the most reliable designs on the market. Both companies have more than a decade of experience and extensive engineering knowledge, providing support for all applications and environments.

ASE provides the most versatile series of ALL ELECTRIC control loading systems in the industry with models to meet every requirement. ASE’s systems are reliable, safe and easily integrated into new builds or legacy system upgrades. “ASE prides itself on customer partnership.  We customize our systems to meet the customer’s exact specifications. We provide training and support every step of the way. This differentiates our company from the rest.” – ASE, Inc.

SimCom Training Centers (http://www.simulator.com) is a comprehensive learning institute offering advanced avionic training.

Press Release: http://simcom.orlandorocks.com/FullPage.aspx?page=Press%20Release%20Beechjet

For more information, please contact ASE, Inc. at +1 727 375 2520 or email info@aerosyseng.com . To learn more about ASE, please visit the company’s web site at www.aerosyseng.com.

NOTABLE MENTIONS

Reading, PA October 3, 2012 – In a formal handover event attended by The Honorable Theodore Sedgwick, Ambassador of the United States to Slovakia and dignitaries of the Slovakian Government and Slovakian Air Force, Pennsylvania-based Fidelity Technologies Corporation completed factory acceptance testing of the G222 (C-27A) Fuselage Load Trainer (FLT) used in support of training the Afghan National Army Air Corps (ANAAC). Fidelity worked in partnership with Virtual Reality Media a.s. and Aeronautical Systems Engineering Inc., with Letecké opravovne Trenčín a.s. (LOTN) for the US Army Program Executive Office Simulation Training and Instrumentation (PEO STRI).

The momentous ceremony represents the culmination of two years of highly collaborative work between the companies from the United States and Slovakia with US Army supervision. The FLT represents the last device in a multi-platform training systems contract in support of training the Afghan forces as part of the NATO International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) efforts. The training systems/simulation package consists of two MI-17v5 Flight Training Devices (FTD), MI-17v5 Basic Aircraft Training Device (BATD), MI-17 Cockpit Procedures Trainer (CPT), G222 (C-27A) FTD and G222 (C-27A) BATD.

The FLT is a highly advanced training device combining a hands-on reconfigurable training platform with simulation tools. Capable of replicating aircraft configurations for troop transportation, ambulatory and medical evacuation, as well as cargo logistics operations, the FLT provides a one-of-a-kind training experience for aircrews and load masters. The team, led by Fidelity, refurbished the government provided fuselage which included repairing the hydraulic and electrical systems, fabricating and installing the cargo handling systems and replicating the aircrew and load master positions while adding touch screen computer systems and tablets for virtual checklists and reference documents. Load master instructors remain on-site to monitor and manage students as they master the skills necessary to operationally configure the G222 aircraft to perform its mission.

Chuck Williamson, General Manager Fidelity Simulation and Training commented at the event, “This simulator represents a state-of-the-art device creating a training environment that exceeds those currently fielded for other aircraft types and is far superior to any other G222/C-27 load trainer. The delivery of these MI-17 and G222 training devices are instrumental in supporting the Afghan people in transitioning the country to peace and stability through a well trained military. Fidelity appreciates the support of the US Army and the collaborative efforts of our industrial partners for making this project highly successful.”

More Technology Insertions Even higher levels of higher fidelity instruction are on the way for customers at corporate training centers, students in university programs and others. CAE’s business customers will benefit from more capable technologies. In addition to enhancements in the Tropos-6000 image generator and the CAE 5000 Series full flight simulator, aircrews may also use the next-generation CAE Simfinity integrated procedures trainer (IPT) with an enhanced virtual cockpit which offers higher-resolution graphics, multi-touch screens, and a new aircraftlike interface action for sliding levers or turning knobs.

All new FlightSafety simulators will feature the company’s 60-inch electric motion and control loading technology, newly enhanced VITAL X visual system and its next generation instructor operating station (IOS). The company also continues to refine and expand its MATRIX Integrated Learning System. Matrix brings the realities of the Level D simulator experience into the classroom and other training devices. SimCom, much like its military counterparts, has an ambitious strategy to keep its training devices concurrent with the business aviation aircraft they support.

One of the simulator upgrades planned during the rest of this year involve one of two, Level D Eclipse simulators to make it conformant with the Total Eclipse model. “We’re half way through it and will have it available by this third quarter. It’s a very high value upgrade for about 100 aircraft that have upgraded to the new configuration.” Brannon said. Indeed, to keep its 58 simulators in a state-of-the-art configuration, SimCom has also installed Garmin WAAS units, specific to simulators, in many of its devices. SimCom also has on its horizon the routine revision and update of various courses through the end of this year.

Frasca is also successfully responding to new developments in this sector. Victor Veltze, a sales representative at the Urbana, Illinois-based company, told CAT that as the increased use of very light jets in ab-initio flight training has gained more relevance, Frasca has delivered numerous Embraer Phenom devices to Finnair Academy and Purdue University. “The FAA itself purchased two Citation Mustang devices, one to use to train their inspectors and another used for research.” Veltze also commented on Frasca’s response to dynamic training requirements, in particular, how advancement in sophisticated avionics has made training in devices more relevant. “Learning how to operate complex systems like ProLine21 and Garmin Perspective correctly from the beginning is crucial, and requires high levels of system simulation and in many cases using actual avionics.”

Aeronautical Systems Engineering, a provider of various military and civil aviation training devices, is preparing to deliver its first Multi-Platform Desktop Advanced Aviation Training Device (AATD). The initial customer, National Aviation Academy, has an order for 10 units, with an option for 10 additional units. The device is designed for use in classroom environments and allows the student to interact with a life-size virtual cockpit to learn the layout and functions of the various instruments within the cockpit. Aspiring business sector pilots will see the AATD’s configurations supporting the King Air C90, Cessna 172 and four Piper models. c

U.S. Air Force Maj. Mark Jones had a huge problem on his hands. His G222 medium transport aircraft had not only experienced an engine flameout, but the weather conditions made it extremely dangerous for his emergency landing at the airstrip in Kabul, Afghanistan. With no choice but to attempt the landing, Jones put his nerves and aviation training to the test and took the 22 ton aircraft in for a successful landing. Minutes later, he was enjoying a hot cup of coffee in Odessa, Fla., with Capt. Brett Speth, a fellow U.S. Air Force aviator, and Master Sgt. Chris Neufeld, a loadmaster, as they discussed the scenario that had just unfolded.

That afternoon, and the rest of the week, the three aviation professionals would spend time in Odessa testing the G222 Flight Training Device (FTD) that will eventually be shipped to Afghanistan to train about 60 Afghan military aviators and loadmasters in successfully overcoming a host of possible emergency situations when they are in control of the real aircraft. Though the combination of a flameout and bad weather was a mock scenario injected into the FTD, the realism could not have been more accurate according to Jones, who is with the 538th Air Expeditionary Advisory Squadron in Kabul, Afghanistan and assigned to train Afghan Air Force pilots. “The G222 Flight Training Device is the most accurate aircraft-type simulator I have ever flown,” he said.

“They got it extremely close to the actual feel of flying a real G222.” Speth, who recently returned from training Afghan pilots, agreed with Jones’s sentiments about the realism of the trainer. “They have done a very good job with this simulator,” said Speth, who is currently assigned to the 37th Flight Training Squadron in Columbus, Miss. “It is so realistic that I found myself looking out the window to clear the area for the propellers when the simulator doesn’t even have propellers!” Adding to the realism of flight in the simulator is the geospecific database that provides current views of actual airfields and terrain in Afghanistan. Using satellite imagery and in-flight photographs taken by pilots in Afghanistan, the 220-degree wraparound screen that is part of the FTD gives these experienced pilots the feeling they are actually flying in familiar terrain. “The visuals are spot on,” Jones said.

“I could fly at low levels in the simulator through the Afghanistan mountains and it would be very accurate to the real terrain. I can almost recognize certain peaks and airfields. It’s beautiful!” As the two pilots were heaping praise on the G222 FTD, some of the members of the PEO STRI and contractor teams who worked hard to get the trainer to this level were beaming with pride. One of those is Mike Younce, a project director with PM Air and Command Tactical Trainers (PM ACTT). “We have a great team in PM ACTT and it’s really good to hear these comments from the subject matter experts,” he said.

“We awarded this contract last April and the first part of the training package, the Basic Aviation Training Device (BATD), was delivered in just six months, which met our requirement. The contractor promised us they could do it and they came through.” The other trainers to be shipped to Afghanistan include the G222 FTD, a G222 Fuselage Load Trainer (FLT) and two Mi-17 FTDs. They will all be delivered by the end of the year. Jones said the BATD, was a “goldmine” for him and the other instructors when it arrived. “We recently had some maintenance issues with the actual aircraft and had to stand down the fleet for a period of time,” he said. “Having the BATD allowed us to get in three simulation periods a day.

This was very fortunate for them because they were deficient in some emergency procedures which we were able to train very easily and very well on the BATD. “There were also a lot of habits we had to help them relearn and adjust as far as emergency procedures. The BATD allowed us to walk these guys through an emergency procedure, pause the simulator when we needed to explain a point and have them do it again and again,” he said. “It was just like them learning the normal procedures.” The contractor, Fidelity Technologies Corporation, is equally proud of the end product that they and their subcontractor, Aeronautical Systems Engineering in Odessa, are fielding. “You can practice everything in the G222 FTD other than actually throwing cargo out the back,” said Jerry Steinman, a program manager with Fidelity. “We have the full database for Afghanistan, so they can practice instrument approach from one airport or landing strip to another during night or day, perform full cockpit procedures and even have the loadmaster do the preflight checklist before the pilot comes in.”

The FTD includes training and testing pilots on every emergency procedure that the manufacturer of the G222 publishes for the aircraft. “They can train on reacting to everything while in flight from dual engine flameout to hydraulic failure to landing with a flat tire,” Steinman said. “To make it an even more stressful training situation, we can insert adverse conditions such as high winds, thunderstorms, sand storms, fog and other weather elements.” Speth said the trainers provide a different form of stress for experienced pilots who are reacting to the simulated emergencies and those who are undergoing the training and have less flight time. “For me, the stress in these simulators is more professional than anything else,” he explained. “You want to do the right thing in the most efficient manner possible. It’s embarrassing when you grab the wrong lever, you wait too long to react or you misdiagnose what was wrong.” “It also helps knowing that if you screw up that emergency procedure, you’re not going to actually crash,” Jones added. Speth pointed out that when he was training the Afghanistan pilots on the BATD, they experienced a different type of stress. “You could see on their faces that there was some real stress involved,” he said.

“They wanted to do things right because they are professional pilots, but, not having trained on a simulator before, you could tell the realism of the trainer was stressing them.” One major aspect of the FTD that assists the instructors during training, Jones said, is the additional “off-board” instructor operating station that is outside of the simulator. “It allows us to sit out there and monitor, via camera and audio recording, the interactions of the Afghan crew,” he explained. “Even if they are speaking in their native language we can have an interpreter out there. We can see how they do crew resource management and how they work together to safely fly the aircraft under emergency conditions.” After final install in Kabul, Fidelity will keep a team of instructors and maintenance personnel onsite to maintain the simulator suite and provide training for operation and upkeep of the simulator. James Matthew Barrie, a Scottish novelist and creator of Peter Pan, once said “If you cannot teach me to fly, teach me to sing.” With the assistance of the new G222 flight simulators, Jones and Speth can feel pretty confident they won’t be giving singing lessons to their Afghanistan counterparts anytime soon.

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